Backpack Full of Cash: See this film!

backpack movie

On Sunday, April 23, 2017, I attended a screening of Backpack Full of Cash as part of the Nashville Film Festival. It was sold out.

nashville film festival

Last year, at the Network for Public Education National Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, I was fortunate to attend a screening of a rough cut of this film and meet the filmmakers. Matt Damon narrates the film, and we had Nancy Carlsson-Paige (his mom!), introduce the film to us. It was pretty cool to say the least.

Over at the blog Busted Pencils, Tim Slekar has an interview with the filmmakers discussing why they felt compelled to make this film. In the film, filmmakers Sarah Mondale and Vera Aronow focus on the 2013-2014 school year in three cities where corporate reformers have a strong foothold: Philadelphia, New Orleans, and Nashville, as well as other cities. They clearly show the negative effect that school choice, through charter school expansion in some places and the introduction of vouchers in others, has had on the public school system. It’s both heartbreaking and maddening to watch, and I found myself wanting to scream at the screen in frustration about what was happening to public schools in these cities.

Nashville is featured in the film, so I watched it with perhaps even more interest than I would have otherwise, and several people I know are in it – school board member Amy Frogge, and teachers Michele Sheriff and Jennifer Eilender. It’s both exciting and sad to see Nashville up there on the screen. Exciting because Cool! I live there! This is the district where my daughter attends school and where I taught for a year! Yay! And sad because of what is happening here with charter schools and how their continued expansion harms our public schools.

Nashville teacher Michele Sheriff, Filmmakers Sarah Mondale and Vera Aronow, and Nashville School Board Member Amy Frogge at the film’s Nashville debut


This film raises the question of school choice, what it is, and how it should be done – or not done. Linda Darling-Hammond recently wrote in The Nation about this topic as well:

Clearly, the issues surrounding school choice are more complex than the typical pro-charter/anti-charter battle lines might suggest. The central question for a public-education system in a democratic society is not whether school options should exist, but whether high-quality schools are available to all children. The fact that choice doesn’t guarantee quality should be clear each time we flick through 500 cable-TV channels without finding a single good viewing option. In public education, this kind of choice is not an acceptable outcome.

The key question, therefore, is whether we can create a system in which all schools are worth choosing and all children are chosen by good schools. How might DeVos’s agenda affect these goals?

One facet of the charter fight is whether or not charters are doing any good. Darling-Hammond writes about a recent study: “Despite the rush to trade district-run public schools for privately managed options, the research has found mixed results for both voucher programs and charter schools, with some charters doing better and others doing worse than public schools. For example, a large-scale study of student data from 16 states by Stanford’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes found that only 17 percent of charters produced academic gains that were better than those at traditional public schools, while 37 percent performed worse than their public-school counterparts. Most showed no difference.”

So…. let me look more closely at that data… Hmm…

Seems like… maybe…  charters aren’t worth it. Maybe… we should just be investing all those backpacks full of cash into our existing schools? Hmm?

Sometimes the best solutions are the most obvious ones: LET’S SUPPORT OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. Sounds simple. But why isn’t it done?

Her closing thoughts: “At the end of the day, the public welfare is best served when investments in schools enable all young people to become responsible citizens prepared to participate effectively in the political, social, and economic life of their democracy.”

Seems like a good plan to me. We’ve got established public schools all over the country that need our attention, our funding, and most importantly, our support.

***

Amy Frogge, who has long been a champion of public schools, writes here, in a Facebook post, why she loves public schools:

Like many parents, I initially worried about enrolling my children in our zoned public schools, because I heard negative gossip about local schools when we first moved to our neighborhood. But our experiences in local public schools have been overwhelmingly positive. This year, my daughter is a 7th grader at H.G. Hill Middle School, and my son is a 4th grader at Gower Elementary School. They have attended our zoned neighborhood schools since pre-k (my son) and kindergarten (my daughter). Our local schools are Title 1 schools (Gower recently came off the Title 1 list) serving widely diverse populations.

If you have not considered Nashville’s zoned public schools, you really should. These are just a FEW of my children’s experiences in our schools:

My children have taken many educational field trips over the years. My son has traveled to Chattanooga to visit the Challenger Space Center and the Creative Discovery Museum. My daughter has visited the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta, Discovery Park of America in Union City, TN, and Wonderworks in Pigeon Forge, TN. This year, she is heading to Six Flags for a second time with her middle school band. (Last year, she played at Six Flags over Atlanta, and this year, she’ll play at Six Flags over St. Louis.) As part of this year’s band trip, she’ll also tour The Gateway Arch and Museum of Westward expansion.

Here in Nashville, my children have taken field trips to the Adventure Science Center and planetarium, Traveler’s Rest (to learn about history), the Nashville Zoo, Cheekwood Botanical Gardens, the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, and the Schermerhorn Symphony Hall (where they learned about instruments from a symphony member and a Nashville sessions player). They have sung with their elementary school choir at the State Capitol, Nashville City Hall, and the County Music Hall of Fame. They have both studied songwriting in a special segment which brings professional songrwriters to their school to set their songs to music. This year, my children both participated in the Project Based Learning Expo at Trevecca Nazarene University, where my son presented a project on the book “I am Malala” and my daughter presented a project on Samurai.

My children have both performed in a 1950s-60s music revue and in numerous choir and theatrical performances. My son played “The Prince” in “Cinderella” last year at Gower and this year will play “Scar” in “The Lion King.” His drama teacher suggested him for a NECAT children’s show, so he also went to a studio this fall to film a television production.

In elementary school, my children helped hatch baby chicks in the classroom in spring. The teacher who hatches chicks also operates an animal camp each summer at her nearby farm, where children learn about both farm animals and exotics- and also just spend time playing in the creek! My children have also attended other summer camps through the school, including Camp Invention, where they built their own pinball machines and more.

My daughter now plays in three bands at her middle school: the 7th-8th grade band, the Honor Band, and a rock band. She recently participated in a band competition at MTSU and was thrilled when her middle school band won awards. My daughter has learned to play three different instruments and also has been invited to sing solos with her rock band (for which she also plays the piano). She has played soccer, played basketball, and currently runs track at H.G. Hill Middle, where she also serves as a Student Ambassador and gives tours of the school to prospective families.

My children have both participated in numerous clubs at their schools, including robotics/coding (my son can now code games on his own), cartooning club, gardening club, and the Good News Club. In Encore, my daughter built rollercoasters to learn about physics, and my son has extracted DNA from strawberries. My son was excited to learn today that he will soon study special effects makeup in his drama class, and he will also soon participate in the school’s “Wax Museum”: In 4th grade, every student dresses up as an historical figure and shares that person’s story with those who come to tour the “museum.”

My children have experienced ALL of this because of public education in Nashville. They are learning SO much- not only academically, but also about their community and the larger world from their friends who come from many different countries and speak many languages. I believe the education my children have received in our often underappreciated zoned schools rivals any they would receive from private schools in Nashville or the more coveted public schools in more affluent areas of Middle Tennessee. My children are both doing well academically, and they are getting all they need to be happy, well-rounded, and confident.

Public schools rock!

Please support our public schools! Our public school teachers, leaders and staff work hard to serve our children well.

I couldn’t have said it better myself.

***

Even though Backpack Full of Cash focuses on the 2013-2014 school year, the filmmakers have added an epilogue to the film which clearly connects what happened during that school year to our present situation. With the election of Trump and the appointment of DeVos as Secretary of Education, the issues raised in this prescient film are more important than ever.

So, here’s my advice: SEE THIS FILM! If you care about public education and you want to know what we public school advocates are fighting for, SEE THIS FILM!

Dewey quote

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